Ripple tank experiment lab report. Ripple Tank Experiment 2019-01-07

Ripple tank experiment lab report Rating: 9,2/10 1951 reviews

IB Physics: Activity: Waves in a ripple tank

ripple tank experiment lab report

Physics can explain these concepts. The way volcanoes operate can be understood, on a basic level, by just some simple physics and chemistry, this paper will investigate and explain some of the basic physics that govern the behavior of volcanoes. Models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly. As straight waves strike a hard straight surface they are reflected at an angle equal to the angle of incidence. Where would be the most sheltered place to moor? Most of the time this disturbance is by an earthquake but can be from meteorites, landslides, or even explosions. All materials on this website are for the exclusive use of teachers and students at subscribing schools for the period of their subscription.

Next

Basic experiments with ripple tanks

ripple tank experiment lab report

Remote sensing offers extensive applications in almost every area of science from monitoring forest fires to geologic mapping. Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again. The circuit is started and the rheostat is adjusted to get 1. A circuit as shown in the diagram above is set up. The reflector is then adjusted so that the incident waves approach the reflector at incident angles of 20˚, 40˚, 60˚ and 80˚ as shown in diagram b. A magnet is placed into the solenoid slowly.

Next

Ripple Tank System: PASCO

ripple tank experiment lab report

A ripple tank is set up. It was not until during the period of Greek culture that the first systematic treatment of physics started with the use of mechanics. A eureka wire is connected in the circuit as shown in the diagram. Diffraction can also be a concern in some technical applications and it sets a fundamental limit to the resolution of a camera, telescope, or microscope. Use of the ripple tank can be a powerful tool to help students visualize wave behavior in general. The experiment is repeated with ammeter readings 0.

Next

Basic experiments with ripple tanks

ripple tank experiment lab report

The voltage across the eureka wire, V is measured using the voltmeter. When the water is disturbed it can be seen on a white surface positioned under the tray. When the amount of interference decreases, the width of any given antinode increases. At any angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, all incident light is reflected none is refracted. I V A curve graph with increasing slope is obtained. The people who built Stone Henge had knowledge of physical mechanics in order to move the rocks and place them on top of each other.

Next

Physics of Water Waves :: Lab Report

ripple tank experiment lab report

Step 2 is repeated with current values of 0. The next phenomenon observed was the refraction of water waves. Wave behavior can be described in terms of how fast the disturbance spreads, and in terms of the distance between successive peaks of the disturbance the wavelength. The refraction was demonstrated in the ripple tank by dividing the tank into a deep and shallow region. Describe in a series of steps how this works. In a fast medium, the wavelength is longer, shorter allowing a greater distance to be travelled each second; while in a slow medium, the wavelength is longer, shorter thereby restricting the distance travelled each second.

Next

Diffraction in a ripple tank

ripple tank experiment lab report

The reflected waves are then straight. Use the relationship to deduce the time period of each wave. Magnify a computer screen and you can see this. Refractive Index We can describe how much a wave is refracted using a quantity called refractive index. There are 3 types of cones- red, green and blue sensitive. Conclusion: When the frequency of the sound wave increases, its pitch increases. Experiments: We can produce our own transverse waves using a ripple tank.

Next

Practical Physics: Basic Experiments with Ripple Tanks

ripple tank experiment lab report

Refraction When the wave passes into a different medium the wavelets progress at a different velocity causing a change in direction. Two spherical dippers are placed 5 cm apart and adjusted so that they touch the water surface at the same level. When the amount of interference increases, the width of any given antinode decreases. Here you can see how a plane wave front can be made of a large number of wavelets. Results: When the student walks in front of the speakers, alternating loud and soft sounds are heard. After diffraction a wave will have the same speed, frequency and wavelength.


Next

Physics of Water Waves :: Lab Report

ripple tank experiment lab report

One the largest tsunamis in recent history was the Cascadia tsunami in 1700. Each wavelet progresses forwards adding to give the new wave front. Vibrations in materials set up wavelike disturbances that spread away from the source. Conclusion: The resistance of the wire is directly proportional to the length of the wire. Physics for You pp171 and 186-192, questions 1-14 pp192-193 Sound Remember that sound is a that Therefore if there is no air there can be no sound.

Next

Practical Physics: Basic Experiments with Ripple Tanks

ripple tank experiment lab report

The metal rod is wrapped with 10 turns of the insulated copper wire and both ends are connected to a circuit as shown in the diagram. The current is switched off. Law of Reflection- the principle that when a ray of light, radar pulse, or the like, is reflected from a smooth surface the angle of reflection is equal to the angle of incidence, and the incident ray, the reflected ray, and the normal to the surface at the point of incidence all lie in the same plane. Early applications of physics include the invention of the wheel and of primitive weapons. The motor is started to generate incident water waves. The boat floats on the water according to Archimedes Principle which states an immersed object is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid it displaces.

Next